Monday, April 25, 2011, 4:30 pm - 9 pm
School of International and Public Affairs, Room 1512, Columbia University
420 West 118th St. 15th Floor New York, NY 10027


Organized by the Consulate General of the
Republic of Hungary
in New York
in Cooperation with the New York Hungarian Scientific Society and Columbia University’s East Central European Center

HUNGARIAN SCIENTISTS
IN THE US:

YESTERDAY, TODAY
AND TOMORROW

A Glimpse at the Achievements
of Hungarian Scientists on this
Side of the Atlantic

Click the image or here to open 34 pages
pdf (1,455 Kb) booklet with all details

Photos: Zoltán Tardos and Gabriella Gyorffy


Program

 

4:30-5:00

Opening

Chairman:

András Prékopa, Professor, Rutgers University,  Professor Emeritus, Eötvös University, member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

4:30-4:40

Opening remarks: Ambassador Károly Dán, Consul General of Hungary, New York

4:40-4:50

Opening remarks: John Micgiel Director, East Central European Center, Columbia University

4:50-4:55

Welcoming remarks: Zsófia Trombitás, Consul

4:55-5:00

Welcoming remarks: János Bergou, President of the NYHSS

5:00-5:15

Coffee break                            

5:15-6:15

Session 1: Hungarian Science: The early days

Chairman:

István Deák, Professor emeritus, Columbia University, External member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

5:15-5:30

Péter Lax: John von Neumann: mathematics, computing, and technology

5:30-5:45

Attila Pók: Some aspects of  Hungarian creativity in modern social sciences and humanities

5:45-6:00

István Hargittai: Edward Teller and Nuclear Safety

6:00-6:15

Ábel Lajtha: Albert Szent-Györgyi

6:15-6:25

Coffee break

6:25-8:10

Session 2: Hungarian Science: Today and Tomorrow 

Chairman:

János Bergou, Professor, CUNY Hunter College, DSc of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

6:25-6:40

Albert-László Barabási: Scale-free networks

6:40-6:55

György Buzsáki: Neural syntax and cognition

6:55-7:10

László Záborszky: Basal forebrain: Anatomy to function

7:10-7:25

Péter Lévai: Strongly interacting quarks in the Large Hadron Collider

7:25-7:40

Szabolcs Márka: The search for gravitational waves

7:40-7:55

Zoltán Haiman: The Life and Times of Black Holes Throughout  Cosmic Time

7:55-8:10

Questions and Answers

8:10-8:15

Closing remarks
Ambassador Károly Dán, Consul General of Hungary, New York

8:15

Refreshments and Hungarian wine


Chairman: András Prékopa, Professor, Rutgers University, 
Professor Emeritus, Eötvös University, member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Opening remarks: Ambassador Károly Dán, Consul General of Hungary, New York

Opening remarks: John Micgiel Director,
East Central European Center, Columbia University

Welcoming remarks: Zsófia Trombitás, Consul

Welcoming remarks: János Bergou, President of the NYHSS

Session 1: Hungarian Science: The early days
Chairman: István Deák,
Professor emeritus, Columbia University,
External member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Péter Lax: John von Neumann: mathematics, computing, and technology

Attila Pók: Some aspects of Hungarian creativity in modern social sciences and humanities

István Hargittai: Edward Teller and Nuclear Safety

Ábel Lajtha: Albert Szent-Györgyi

Session 2: Hungarian Science: Today and Tomorrow
Chairman: János Bergou,
Professor, CUNY Hunter College, DSc of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Albert-László Barabási: Scale-free networks

György Buzsáki: Neural syntax and cognition

László Záborszky: Basal forebrain: Anatomy to function

Péter Lévai: Strongly interacting quarks in the Large Hadron Collider

Szabolcs Márka: The search for gravitational waves

Zoltán Haiman: The Life and Times of Black Holes Throughout Cosmic Time

Closing remarks Ambassador Károly Dán, Consul General of Hungary, New York


Related links:

Consulate General of Hungary in New York, USA

New York Hungarian Scientific Society (NYHSS)

Columbia University

Hungarian Consulate General, New York - gimagine photo reports

NYHSS - gimagine photo reports